Houston → Austin

My buddy and I rode from Houston, TX to Austin, TX over the course of 2 days in the beginning of December. We had never been to Texas before, did not plan out a route, and were not prepared for what was in store.

 First Day

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Above: On our way to Texas. Around 4:30 AM

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Above: Building the bikes back up

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Above/Below: Morning of the longest day of our lives

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Within the first 2.5 hours my buddy experienced a series of flat tires. In that amount of time we were only able to travel about 11 miles. As a result, we were way behind schedule. The plan was to ride about 110 the first day and 80 the following.

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Top Left: Some creepy guy at Wal-Mart asked if he could take our picture. We complied

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Above: Texas wouldn’t be complete without tranquilizer darts and cows

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We certainly made it the 110 miles the first day, but we ended up riding about 40 miles in the pitch black. The ride was less than scenic. It was a full day of farms and rabid dogs. Every farm had a vicious attack dog(s) that would run after us as we rode by. This was by far the scariest part of the journey. The dogs were fast as hell and we had no way to protect ourselves. We had to pray that our legs could power us past the dog. Fortunately, we did not sustain any bites. However, after the sun went down we came to a dirt road that we could not ride on. We had no choice, but to walk.

So there we were with our bikes, gear, and one dinky light in the middle of rural Texas on a dirt road. Better yet, our cell phones lost service. As we walked up the dirt road we could hear dogs growling and clawing at their fences. I was seconds away from curling up in the fetal and calling 9-1-1. At one point I actually began to whimper. It was an act of God that all the dogs were locked up on the dirt road. If they were not, there is no doubt that my friend and I would have been seriously injured. We ended up walking about 2 miles until we hit pavement again. We arrived at our destination around 10 pm. That day we rode for about 15 hours. The hard ground under my sleeping bag had never felt so good. DCIM100GOPRO IMG_0984_3 IMG_0997_3 DCIM100GOPRO

Below: A beautiful sunset was the beginning of a terror ride

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Bottom: The best sign I have ever seen in my life. The road our campsite was on.

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  Second Day

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Above/Below: Our campsite was beautiful. It was on Lake Fayette

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Above: La Grange, TX     Below: Colorado River

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Below: 50 miles stretch of freeway riding. Checkout the speed limit and truck

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Below: About 6 miles out of Austin. Gigantic flat that couldn’t be repaired

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The second day was much more cheerful due to the shorter distance and daylight. However, we quickly came to a dead-end. The only way forward was on a major highway. A clerk inside Rattlers (the Texas 7/11) ensured us that the freeway was safe for bikers. It certainly was not safe, but I don’t think it was illegal. We rode about 50 miles on the shoulder of the highway where the speed limit was 75 mph. The second day was going pretty well until a pit bull bolted from his home and actually caught up to us on the freeway. If we swerved left we would have been smashed by a car and if we slowed down we would have been eaten. I swear the pit bull’s tongue grazed my buddies tire. Once again, by the grace of God, the pit bull eventually tired out.

After the dog chase we were making great time. We were able to keep up a steady pace the entire day. We were sure we could make it to the Hostel before sundown. Right around 4:45 we were about 6 miles away. We could see the sky line. Just as my excitement started to rise, I rode over an insane shard of metal and my back tire exploded. We attempted to patch it, but within 5 minutes it as flat again. The tire had a huge hole in it, making it impossible to ride on. So just as we had struggled in the beginning of our trip, we walked 5 miles in the dark to the hostel. It was somewhat humiliating, but we were able to laugh it off. It actually gave us some time to process the journey we had just completed.

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We spent the next 5 days living in a small hostel bedroom, riding our bikes, and exploring Austin, TX . It was glorious. Check out some of the pictures below

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Above/Below: Our daily ride from North Austin to Downtown (South Austin). Beautiful!

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Below: From South to North, death on both sides.

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2 Responses to Houston → Austin

  1. Pingback: Pedals Always Come Around | Bike and Brain

  2. Pingback: 5 Reasons I know Jesus Pedals With Me | Bike and Brain

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